Ex Turpi Causa Non Oritur Actio

Kedar Nath Motani, (1960) 1 SCR 861 had an occasion to consider the question of application of the maxims ‘ex turpi causa non oritur actio‘ and ‘ex dolo malo non oritur actio‘. The Three-­Judge Bench, speaking through M. Hidayatullah, J. (as His Lordship then was), observed thus: “The correct position in law, in our opinion, […]

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Albert, Albert Einstein

A. “Albert Einstein spoke of change when he said, ‘the world as we have created is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking’.” – Hon’ble Chief Justice of India, Hon’ble Justice T.S. Thakur, Board of Control for Cricket v. Cricket Association of Bihar, (2016) 8 SCC 535. B. “We would […]

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The Doctrine of Separation of Powers

“The most significant impact of the Doctrine of Separation of Powers is seen and felt in terms of the institutional independence of the Judiciary from other Organs of the State. Judiciary, in terms of personnel, the Judges, is independent. Constitutional Bench Judgments have uniformly ruled that the Doctrine of Separation of Powers, though not specifically […]

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Hard Cases Make Bad Law

Hon’ble Justice L. Nageswara Rao in State of Tamil Nadu v. G. Hemalathaa, Civil Appeal No. 6669 of 2019 quoted Chief Justice John Roberts in Caperton v. A.T. Massey, 556 U.S. 868 (2009). “Extreme cases often test the bounds of established legal principles. There is a cost to yielding to the desire to correct the […]

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Non-Signatories to Arbitration II

Arbitration Agreements need not be a formal contract. Section 7(4)(b) states that an Arbitration Agreement can be derived from exchange of letters, telex, telegram or other means of communication, including through electronic means. What is required to be ascertained is the intention of the parties to refer their disputes or differences to Arbitration. The intention […]

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Per Incuriam II

“When a Court ignores the binding precedent of a Larger Bench, the Judgment so delivered is held to be per incuriam and has no precedential value. The principle of per incuriam has been developed by the English Courts in relaxation of the rule of stare decisis. In practice per incuriam is per ignoratium. See, Paragraph […]

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